Homeschoolers and College

On the first day, God created light and it was good. On the second day, God created the heavens between the separated waters, and together the light and the heavens were good. He continued with each day’s creation being deemed good until the sixth day. On the sixth day, God created land animals and then man, male and female, in His image, to rule over all of creation. All of His creation was very good.

Being created in the image of our creating God, it is inherent in us to desire to make good things into more good things, and more good things into very good things.

Will a Classical Education Get Your Child a Job?

If there is a question that just begs for both a “yes” and a “no” answer, it is this question: Will a classical education get your child a job?

We homeschooling parents worry about our children’s future. We want them to be successful, get married, and make a difference. We imagine them with flourishing lives buoyed by a Christ-centered, classically formed educational foundation. And then we stare into the high school years and think maybe now is a good time to switch back to something more predictable, more familiar, more status quo.

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110 rules of Civility & Decent Behavior

Last week I mentioned briefly the 110 rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation that George Washington copied out by hand into his copybook. I’d like to delve into those rules a little more deeply this week.

These 110 rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation are based on a set of rules composed by French Jesuits in 1595. Presumably they were copied out as part of an exercise in penmanship assigned by young Washington’s schoolmaster. The first English translations of the French rules appeared in 1640, and are ascribed to Francis Hawkins, the 12-year-old son of a doctor. From the Hawkins book the 110 rules copied by Washington were selected, simplified and arranged by some person at present unknown.

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Amos Fortune and True Freedom

In celebration of Black History Month, we would like to commemorate one of the great heroes of American history, Amos Fortune.

Amos was born an African prince named At-mun. When he was only fifteen, slave traders kidnapped and auctioned At-mun into a life of slavery in Massachusetts, where he was renamed Amos.

For nearly three decades Amos endured the injustices of slavery. However, he never lost hope for a future of freedom. Finally, Amos bought his freedom. Thereafter, he started his own tanning business in New Hampshire, saved money, and purchased freedom for many other slaves.

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Booker T. Washington and True Success

Born into slavery, Booker T. Washington and his family were emancipated after the Civil War. Growing up, Washington endured many hardships. Nevertheless, he learned the value of hard work, education, and perseverance as he ascended the ranks of society.

Our Challenge I students read and discuss Booker T. Washington’s autobiography, Up from Slavery, comparing and contrasting it with the earlier Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.

Amidst retelling his life’s story in Up from Slavery, Washington often provides brief yet powerful insights on the importance and true meaning of education, industriousness, happiness, and success.

The latter theme, success, consistently emerges throughout the text. So, as tribute to this influential and inspiring individual, here are three lessons from Booker T. Washington about true success.

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The Education of Washington and Lincoln

President George Washington was born on Feb. 22, 1732. President Abraham Lincoln was also a February baby, born Feb. 12, 1809. We now celebrate their lives—and those of our other presidents—on Presidents Day, the third Monday each February.

Ask any American the names of the two greatest U.S. presidents, and more than likely you will receive the same answer: Washington and Lincoln.

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I Survived Mock Trial

For several years, I regarded the coming of Challenge B with fear and trembling because of one thing: Mock Trial. I had never participated in any form of debate during my school years, so it was a vast unknown. (Well, not entirely unknown, but I am not sure my fascination with courtroom dramas on television counts as courtroom experience.) I was not sure I could help my son with Mock Trial in any constructive way. Yet I concealed my fears from him, took a deep breath, and took the plunge.

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Top Four Things You Can Learn from the Science Fair

Imagine this: an episode of “The Twilight Zone.” The main character: a parent who did a horrible job on her junior high science fair project. Fast-forward to the present day. The plot: the parent is now trapped in an endless cycle of producing science fair projects until she finally gets it right.

In all seriousness, I must confess that I approached the Challenge B science fair project with a mixture of fear and dread. By the time I reached my son’s age, it had already been decided that I was a literature and languages person, not a science person. Even though I found science texts interesting and I made good grades, by age 13, I already wholeheartedly believed in the airtight categories of science people, math people, English people, art people, and so on. Therefore, I did not try very hard to come up with a great project; after all, no one expected me to—not even me.

Join CC‘s Fellowship of the King

There is a scene in The Fellowship of the Ring that totally redefined the word “fellowship” for me. Fellowship is a word that has become so common among church members that it has been watered down to mean almost nothing. If teens are talking outside, but doing nothing, we say, “Well at least they’re fellowshipping.” We have a large empty room called the “fellowship hall” that you can rent for graduation parties. What fellowship meant in The Fellowship of the Ring, however, is something much more profound.

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 Classical Conversations